TANEUM BAMBRICK & JOSEPH LEASE

WHERE: St Andrew's Episcopal Church

545 S 5th Ave, Tucson, Arizona 85701

WHEN: Saturday, January 11, 2020 at 7PM

$5 General / $3 Students / No one turned away

Poetry reading
Light refreshments served
Handicap accessible / Accommodations available on request

More about the event & the poets!

TANEUM BAMBRICK is the author of Vantage, which was selected by Sharon Olds for the 2019 American Poetry Review/Honickman first book award (Copper Canyon Press 2019). Her chapbook, Reservoir, was selected by Ocean Vuong for the 2017 Yemassee Chapbook Prize. A graduate of the University of Arizona’s MFA program, she is the winner of an Academy of American Poets University Prize, an Environmental Writing Fellowship from the Vermont Studio Arts Center, and the 2018 BOOTH Nonfiction Contest. Her poems and essays appear or are forthcoming in The New Yorker, The American Poetry Review, PEN, Narrative, The Missouri Review, 32 Poems, West Branch, and elsewhere. She has received scholarships from the Sewanee Writers’ Conference, and the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference. She is a Stegner Fellow at Stanford University.

https://www.taneumbambrick.com/

JOSEPH LEASE'S critically acclaimed books of poetry include The Body Ghost (Coffee House Press, 2018), Testify (Coffee House Press, 2011), and Broken World (Coffee House Press, 2007). Lease’s poems "'Broken World' (For James Assatly)" and "Send My Roots Rain" were anthologized in Postmodern American Poetry: A Norton Anthology. Lease's poem “Free Again (Why don’t people)” was published in the New York Times. Lease’s poetry readings are collected at PennSound, The Poetry Center at San Francisco State University, KQED (NPR), The Scottish Poetry Library, and The Poetry Project. Lease has received The Academy of American Poets Prize and numerous grants and awards in poetry and poetics from Columbia University, Brown University, Harvard University, and California College of the Arts. He is a member of the advisory board of the Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics.

Marjorie Perloff wrote: “The poems in Joseph Lease’s Broken World are as cool as they are passionate, as soft-spoken as they are indignant, and as fiercely Romantic as they are formally contained . . . Lease has complete command of his poetic materials. His poems are spellbinding in their terse and ironic authority: Yes, the reader feels when s/he has finished, this is how it was -- and how it is. An exquisite collection!

JON MILLER & NATHAN DRAGON

WHERE: Studio ONE A Space for Art & Activism

197 E Toole Ave, Tucson, Arizona 85701

WHEN: Thursday, January 16, 2020 at 7PM

$5 General / $3 Students / No one turned away

Poetry reading followed by Q&A
Light refreshments served
Handicap accessible / Accommodations available on request

More about the event & the poets!

NATHAN DRAGON has previously been published in Noon Annual, Fence, and New York Tyrant Magazine. Nathan currently lives in Salem, MA.

JON MILLER's recent writing can be found in A Dozen Nothing and A South Broadway Ghost Society. He currently teaches at Central China Normal University, Wuhan, where he founded Osmanthus, a press devoted to publishing experimental and innovative chapbooks and other objects.

Light refreshments provided
Books and other fine printed goods for sale

JULIE EZELLE PATTON & DOT DEVOTA

WHERE: Steinfeld Warehouse Community Arts Space

101 W 6th St, Tucson, Arizona 85701

WHEN: Saturday, January 25, 2020 at 7PM

$5 General / $3 Students / No one turned away

Poetry reading followed by Q&A
Light refreshments served
Handicap accessible / Accommodations available on request

More about the event & the poets!

JULIE EZELLE PATTON was born and braised in Ohideyhideho, north coast facing the republic of Ontario. Her work has primarily appeared in live spoken-sung performance art pieces in honor of the sound presence of all earthlinks. She has performed throughout the Americas, Europe, and the Milky Way.

Patton’s most recent bound-ink-to-paper production is Notes for Some (Nominally) Awake. Her work has appeared in ((eco (lang)(uage(reader)), I’ll Drown My Book, What I Say and other publications. Julie is a self­proclaimed “phonemenologist” whose book length serial poem B (Tender Buttons Press) and Writing with Crooked Ink (Belladonna) are forthcoming. In 2015, Julie was honored with a Foundation for Contemporary Arts Grants to Artists award and an Atlantic Center for the Arts Master Artist Residency. She used to teach creative writing through Teachers & Writers Collaborative, museums, universities, and other crack joints (until she bought her freedom).

DOT DEVOTA is the author of The Division of Labor (Rescue Press, 2015), And The Girls Worried Terribly (Noemi Press, 2014), and The Eternal Wall (BookThug, 2013). Born in St. Louis, Missouri, she writes prose about the Midwest and has traveled full-time since 2010. Excerpts from her book, MW: A Field Guide to the Midwest (Pages from a Diary Never Written) are published in PEN America, The Offing, Fanzine, Entropy, Make Magazine, Denver Quarterly, and The Volta. Her poems have been translated into Arabic and French and appear on walls.

Brenda Hillman & Robert Hass

WHERE: Steinfeld Warehouse Community Arts Space

101 W 6th St, Tucson, Arizona 85701

WHEN: Sunday, February 2, 2020 at 7PM

$5 General / $3 Students / No one turned away

Poetry reading followed by Q&A
Light refreshments served
Handicap accessible / Accommodations available on request

More about the event & the poets!

BRENDA HILLMAN is known for poems that draw on elements of found texts and document, personal meditation, observation, and literary theory. Often described as “sensuous” and “luminescent,” Hillman’s poetry investigates and pushes at the possibilities of form and voice, while remaining grounded in topics such as geology, the environment, politics, family, and spirituality. In an interview with Sarah Rosenthal, Hillman described her own understanding of form: “It is the artist’s job to make form. Not even to make it, but to allow it. Allow form. And all artists have a different relationship to it, and a different philosophy of it … I think that when you are trying to open up a territory—in this case I was working with a desire to open the lyric—you have to be greedy, in that you want more than you can do. And you’re always bound to fail.” Praising Hillman’s deft handling of form and subject, Marjorie Welish wrote, “Each poem … creates its own experimental configuration, within which the phrase swerves and discombobulates sense, as several registers of subject complicate the sampling of experiences and also as the experimental format throws the lyric into symbolic disarray one moment and naturalist scrutiny the next. And even more: she writes as if the lyric poem had a political calling.”

Born in 1951 in Tucson, Arizona, Hillman earned degrees at Pomona College and the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. The author of over 10 books of poetry, she has received numerous awards for her work including fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Guggenheim Foundation, the Academy of American Poets, the Poetry Society of America, as well as a Pushcart Prize and the Delmore Schwartz Memorial Award. Read the full bio.

ROBERT HASS is one of the most celebrated and widely-read contemporary American poets. In addition to his success as a poet, Hass is also recognized as a leading critic and translator, notably of the Polish poet Czeslaw Milosz and Japanese haiku masters Basho, Buson, and Issa. Critics celebrate Hass’s own poetry for its clarity of expression, its concision, and its imagery, often drawn from everyday life. “Hass has noted his own affinity for Japanese haiku,” the poet Forrest Gander remarked, “and his work similarly attends to the details of quotidian life with remarkable clarity.” Gander described Hass’s gift for “musical, descriptive, meditative poetry.” Carolyn Kizer wrote in the New York Times Book Review that Hass” is so intelligent that to read his poetry or prose, or to hear him speak, gives one an almost visceral pleasure.” Hass told interviewer David Remnick in the Chicago Review, “Poetry is a way of living. … a human activity like baking bread or playing basketball.”

Hass’s first collection, Field Guide (1973), won the Yale Series of Younger Poets Award. It drew on Hass’s native California countryside and background in Slavic studies. “The poems in Field Guide,” wrote Gander, “are rich with Russian accents, aromas of ferny anise and uncorked wines, and references to plant and animal life: the green whelks and rock crabs, tanagers and Queen Anne’s lace, sea spray and pepper trees of the Bay Area.” In the Southwest Review Michael Waters declared, “Field Guide is a means of naming things, of establishing an identity through one’s surroundings, of translating the natural world into one’s private history. This is a lot to accomplish, yet Robert Hass manages it with clarity and compassion.” Hass confirmed his ability with Praise (1979), his second volume of poems, which won the William Carlos Williams Award.

From 1995 to 1997, Hass set aside his personal role as poet to take up the mantle of the nation’s poet, serving as U.S. poet laureate. A largely ceremonial position, historically speaking, the poet laureate has recently become far more of a public advocate for poets and their work. In a sense, the new role was a logical extension of Hass’s personal, private work to a public arena. Read the full bio.

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